A Complete List of Essays

An Index of Works by O.G. Rose (First to Newest)

Frozen Glory Photography

The Creative Concord

Without creativity, the artifex disappears. Once that occurs, the bourgeoisie and the proletariat must clash.

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Inception, Dichotomies, and Freedom

If you claim you are not being incepted, you are only saying that because I claimed that you were.

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Theoretical-Awareness

In teaching theory, we risk rendering theory meaningless.

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Metamentality and the Dismodern Self

Descartes famously said “I think; therefore, I am’;” today, it would be more appropriate to say “I think you think I think you think; therefore, I am.”

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On Worry

Worry is something other people do. We never worry; we care.

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Self-Delusion, the Toward-ness of Evidence, and the Paradox of Judgment

If we judge, we self-delude ourselves into an understanding of the world and those around us that lacks reality, yet the whole reason we judge is to determine what’s real.

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Should We Get Rid of the Internet?

People will generate culture even if they aren’t capable, and if society doesn’t equip its citizens properly, the generated culture will be one that dehumanizes and destroys.

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On “Integrating People of Color” by Bernard Hankins

Bernard Hankins argues that a nation without imag-i-nation will never cease to be a nation of dis-crim-i-nation

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Emotional Judgment

If I am happy, then nothing can take my happiness away. If I feel happy, it will last until I feel sad.

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Joy to The World

The higher the joy, the less likely there is a bubble in the system.

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Representing Beauty

Off and on, without conscious thought, we cannot help but view everything as a potential tweet, Facebook post, and/or picture.

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On Materialism, Purpose, and Discernment

Without purpose, materialism is unavoidable.

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(Im)morality

In recognizing that we are all (im)moral, we are all better equipped to live with it.

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Truth Organizes Values

If there is ultimately no way to determine truth, then there is ultimately no way to assure our values won’t turn against us.

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The Incompleteness of Thought

Whatever you are thinking about is not what you are thinking about.

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Epistemic (Ir)responsibility

If a person allowed others to use a car that the owner knew was unsafe…

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On Love

What do I say when I say “I love you?”

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Discussing that Crazy “A is A” Paper

G: Seemed like the paper wanted to say that ontology and logic are always married…

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On Want and Awe

Everyone has a self, and hence all acts are self-ish and no act is totally self-less…

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Ideas are Not Experiences

Why does history repeat? Why can art we create feel like a failure? Why…?

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On Certainty

What do we say when we say, “I’m certain…?”

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Through (No)thing We Know

We understand what constitutes a cat through the idea of a cat, yet a cat is not its idea…

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Compelling

Why does one person find the case for x compelling while another finds the case against x convincing?

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On Thinking and Perceiving

If I look at a window and think about my grandmother, I perceive the window, but I do not think about it.

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Deconstructing Common Life

Rationality is fundamentally incomplete and can only be balanced with a quest.

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Sensualization

If I think “I’m hungry,” to say “I’m hungry” is to carry out sensualization.

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On Words and Determinism

Words orientate, and relative to that orientation, create/realize the world/future (of a speaker).

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Experiencing Thinking

How do humans experience thinking? Is it willed or does it just appear?

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We Make Our Votes, and Then Our Votes Make Us

We need to stop believing we can determine what people think and who they are based on how they vote.

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The Conflict of Mind

If x is true but there is no evidence verifying x, then it is irrational, intellectually irresponsible, and correct to believe x.

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Innovating Credentials

Breaking up the college monopoly.

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Aesthetics Then Ethics

On particularity and how ethics without aesthetics is legalistic, inefficient, uninspiring, and risks totalitarianism.

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Trivia(l)

Education can suggest in its medium that an educated person is someone who is good at trivia.

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Flip Moments

My present choices always redefine “always.”

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On Beauty

What do we talk about when we talk about beauty?

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Trading Wages for Hours

Imagine someone will give you $10 for one hour of work. Now imagine that he will give you two hours of work if you agree to be paid $9 an hour…

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On “A is A”

On the logic and ontology of “ ‘A/(A-isn’t-A)’ is ‘A/(A-isn’t-A)’ (without B).”

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Austin Farrer and the Problems of Verifiable Education

A person studies Karl Barth now to determine Barth’s theology, not what Barth was “on” when he wrote his theology and why…

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The Protestant Work Ethic” Is Only Half the Story

When lacking sacramental ontology, Protestants are susceptible to being made by their tools.

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The Theological Methodologies of Austin Farrer and Metaphor of Tolstoy

How do we know about God, and how do we live out that knowledge?

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On Critical Thinking

No one who lacks critical thinking thinks they lack critical thinking, for it takes critical thinking to realize you lack it…

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The Truth Is Veiled in Blood

The role of martyrs in light of essential incompleteness.

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On a Staircase

Before asking about the meaning of life, we should first ask about the meaning of a staircase.

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Transposition

Humans seem to have the ability to create universals by speaking, yet there are only particularities in the world.

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The Iliad

The Apocalypse of Achilles

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Reflections On “The Difference Between Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis” by Cadell Last

The brain and the mind “have nothing in common.” The use of the word “nothing” here is a play on words, for Cadell proceeded to claim that the mind is a “lost cause,” something that is essentially “an absence”…

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The Legitimation Crisis of Our Lives

Today, our identities, religions, nationalities, occupations, life choices, philosophies, political ideologies, political leaders — all have ceased to feel legitimate to us.

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Monotheorism

“Monotheorism” is the belief that there exists a single theory that can explain every given phenomenon and/or given event, and it is human nature to be monotheoristic.

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Read(er)

The way a reader interprets a text says a lot about that reader.

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The Trance of Believability

Societies and stories are similar in how they work and fail. Like a story, a society that fails to maintain in its people “a trance of believability,” of legitimacy, is a society in decline.

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Lacks Are Not Nothing

Where things are “without nothing,” then things are “complete in themselves” (there’s “nothing else to see”), but where things are instead “lacking,” things are incomplete (there’s more to the story).

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The Rationality of Invincibility and Self-Destruction

The free market works well because entities aren’t “too big to fail” and can meaningfully compete, and yet “rationality” and “self-interest” — principles which drive wealth creation — drive entities to try to make themselves TBF, hence driving them to threaten if not ruin the wealth creation which justifies their existence.

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The Dialectic Between “Meaningful Memories” and “Pure Experiences”

There is technically no such thing as “meaningful experiences,” only “meaningful memories (about experiences).” An experience is precisely relative to what thought is not involved: it is ultimately a matter of perception, which means it is a matter that doesn’t involve thinking or meaning. There cannot be meaning where there isn’t thought, so “pure experiences” are necessarily meaningless. And yet that meaninglessness can be a source of wonder and beauty.

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Considering “Decadence and the Intellectuals” by Ross Douthat

Are “great thinkers” no longer with us? What happened?

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Learning From How Flowers Bend Out of Shadows

“Pure experience,” for Keiji Nishitani, is basically the experience before Lacan’s “mirror stage” when a child doesn’t recognize his or her self in a mirror; during this time (which we all went through), there is no “hard line” between objects and subjects.

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The Odyssey

What should we do today when we return to a land that was once ours but that we do not recognize?

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On Is-ness/Meaning

What a thing “is” cannot be separated from what a thing “means,” as two sides of a coin are inseparable and yet distinct. A given cup is ultimately a collection of “atomic facts.” Therefore, a cup isn’t a “cup”: what a cup is isn’t what it “is” (to us). To humans, the is-ness of a cup cannot be understood; therefore, when humans speak of is-ness, they speak of what a thing “is” (to them). In other words, what a thing “is” is what a thing “means.”

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Death Is the Event Horizon of Reason

The rational and logical end where death and apocalypse begin; there, the border of thinking is reached…

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What Is Metaphysics?
Section One of a Philosophy of Glimpses

It’s hard to think of a more loaded word in philosophy than “metaphysics,” and it can mean a hundred different things to a hundred different people. To start, it would be useful to review some possible understandings of the term…

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What Is Phenomenology?
Section Two of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Phenomenology is the study of how things “unfold.” It is the study of what x is “like” primarily, with estimations of what x “is” following only secondarily. Even if Kant is correct and the noumenon proves uncrossable, the fact x “unfolds” like y instead of z will give us reason to think x “is” more like b than c…

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Why Didn’t Derrida Deconstruct All Metaphysics?
Section Three of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Any effort to establish a “New Metaphysics” will have to defend itself against Derrida, who seems to have deconstructed all metaphysics with his masterpiece On Grammatology. Why I think Derrida failed is elaborated on in “On Typography” and “(Re)construction,” both by O.G. Rose, but here I will present the outline of the case.

Derrida deconstructed “metaphysics of gaps and judgment” but not “metaphysics of experience and apprehension” (in other papers, I say that Derrida deconstructed “the metaphysics of the book” but not “the metaphysics of reading”). By basing a “New Metaphysics” on phenomenology versus (Platonic) systematizing, we can justify engaging in the practice of metaphysics again…

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Death Denial Is Death Drive

A response to Alex Ebert’s “A Void Dance” on how denying death is to embrace the death drive, while accepting death denies the death drive…

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Why Doesn’t Experience Fall Into “The Problem of Presence” like Words
Section Four of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Does phenomenology really overcome the problem of “presence” that Derrida claims signifiers never can, stuck endlessly deferring? This is the problem Derrida is getting at with his language of différance and “trace” — why does phenomenological experience avoid the problems of language and not fall into its own “ontological gap?” What is experience if not a “presence?” This was a point Lennart Oberlies raised, and I believe it deserves special elaboration.

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What Are Lacks?
Section Five of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Thomas Jockin made the point that not all “lacks” are nothing, and that the conflation of these categories has deeply hurt our capacities to reason, especially to reason metaphysically. This inspired a paper called “Lacks Are Not Nothing,” and here I will try to give an account based on that paper to explain the difference between “lacks” and “nothing.”

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What Is A Phenomenology of Lacks?
Section Six of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Phenomenology is an “art-form” of observation and careful distinctions based on our experience. We draw distinctions between “love” and “like” by taking into consideration how one “unfolds” versus the other. Since x “unfolds” y way while b “unfolds” c way, there is “reason to believe” that x and b aren’t identical. Maybe they are somehow, maybe they overlap here and there, etc., but if “love” unfolds y way and something “like love” folds z way, then there is reason to think that the thing “like love” must not be identical to “love.” And on these grounds, we now have reason to continue or conclude a new philosophical investigation…

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(W)hole Hope

To live is to be conscious; it is to inhabit a mode of being and thinking; it is to hold a set of memories; it is to experience a wide range of emotions; it is to know a wide range of people and things. Everyone who is conscious experiences such things, but only you experience what you experience and how you experience it. This helps constitute your-self, and you can never inhabit the self of another. Hence, there is a gap between you and others, and a sort of “hole” in others that you don’t have in yourself…

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Do “Lacks” Suggest Humans Have Free Will?
Section Seven of a Philosophy of Glimpses

A being with consciousness and will is able to shape its own “formal cause” (to some degree), which means that such a being can also shape it’s “final cause.” While a cup cannot change its formal and final causes, I can change the formal and final causes of myself.

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What Can “(Meta)physical Beings” Uniquely Experience?
Section Eight of a Philosophy of Glimpses

If free will exists and humans can be “toward” “lacks,” humans aren’t purely physical but “(meta)physical,” though that doesn’t mean humans are necessarily not an “emergent” product of ultimately physical forces (that would be a line of inquiry that exceeds the scope of this work). Considering this, we are capable of experiencing “(meta)physical” beings, events, etc. in ways that purely physical or purely nonphysical beings could not…

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The Conclusion
Section Nine of a Philosophy of Glimpses

Who has seen the wind?’ — Christina Rossetti starts her poem with this profound question. ‘Neither I nor you,’ but we have caught glances of trembling leaves and bowing trees, and now it is up to us to remember what we saw when the wind was ‘passing through.’ What passed over us? To answer, let’s start with what we felt.

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The Novel Historian
On the Tropics of Discourse by Hayden White with Davood Gozli

As we can’t visit Lynchburg and just visit “the bank” (because we also have to “visit” all the surrounding buildings, roads, citizens, etc. on the way), so likewise we can’t just discuss “The American Revolution” without also discussing American agriculture, American assumptions about the virtue of freedom, the English language, American literature, and so on…

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“Hegelian Dialectics” Are Not “Discussion Dialectics”

The term “dialectic” is used throughout philosophy but not always in the same way. Some philosophers by “dialectic” mean merely a “back and forth,” like a democratic debate. People will talk about the “dialectic” between Liberals and Conservatives, Republicans and Conservatives, and so on. In this first sense, a “dialectic” and a “debate” are extremely similar, and the key point is that this kind of “Discussion Dialectic” seeks to end the dialectic. The goal is resolution, for the involved parties to come to an agreement that stabilizes the situation.

But this is not the only kind of dialectic…

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Dialectical Ethics

We are a problem that can be managed but never solved, and seeing as “ethical situations” involve people, ethics are also subjects which cannot be solved once and for all. If we determine in one situation that “x is wrong,” it won’t necessarily follow that we never have to worry about x again or that x is always wrong. In c situation, x could be wrong, while in f situation it could be good, and yet tomorrow x could be wrong in f situation — it depends. It will not do for us to say, “x is wrong,” and by that mean always and/or unconditionally, for that is too A/A in an A/B world: it is to take an idea (“x is wrong”) and press it down and over the world, flattening the world. Instead, we need to form a dialectic between our ideas and the world, which would be A/B: perhaps “murder is wrong,” but it would not necessarily be the case that every instance of “ending a life” was murder; it could be the case that some instances of “ending a life” was only “killing.”

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Hegel and the Ontological Implications of “Pure Thought” About What’s Not There

Thinking “about the world” is arguably thinking that only “responds” to the world: it’s cause and origin is arguably the world. But thinking which “wasn’t about the world” — that misunderstood it, that was imaginative, that was completely abstract — didn’t strike Hegel as a “response” to the world, but its “own” cause and origin (thus, created and creative). It struck Hegel as erroneous to treat this second kind of thinking as identical to the first or to — worse yet — “bracket it out” as error and irrelevant, which arguably is what most Enlightenment thinkers did, absolving themselves the responsibility to consider the implications of the second kind of thinking. Hegel, though, wouldn’t grant himself that luxury.

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The Grand Technology

Thanks to technology, everything ‘in this world has become everybody’s issue.’ People we’ve never met ‘are now involved in our lives, as we in theirs, thanks to the electric media.’ What we are orientated “toward” has dramatically changed in our modern age...In the past, it wasn’t possible to be “toward” events much beyond one’s locality, family, community or work; yes, people could read about the war, events in Europe, and so on, but we couldn’t regularly receive “live updates,” hour by hour, about everything that was happening everywhere. In the past, humans weren’t simply more isolated, but also more “truly ignorant” about global events: people not only didn’t know what was happening, they didn’t know they didn’t know. “True ignorance” can cause major problems, but so can bearing knowledge that the knowers don’t know how to bear…

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Atoms and Void

We don’t tend to think of void as what makes being possible, but instead what needs to be “removed” so that being can flourish. Where there is void, being is “sucked in” as if by a black hole; in this way, voids are threats to being, not enablers of it. Worse yet, we seemingly don’t even have a robust category of “not-thing” like “void”: we generally have a dichotomy of “being” and “nothing,” which generally means that we only have a category of “being” because nothing is, well, nothing. “Nothing” for us is a “dismissal category,” a category we use to say, “It isn’t” and “It doesn’t matter.” It’s a “limiting concept,” a “boundary” — we suggest “things can’t be nothing,” which means if we’re talking about nothing, we’re talking about nothing and wasting our time. And so we don’t talk about it, and instead focus on being…

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Coda I of (Re)constructing “A is A”
Considering together “Lacks Are Not Nothing” with“(W)hole Hope,” and the Temptation of Ambiguities We Singularize

“Lacks” and “holes” are very similar, and both create “ambiguities,” for they exist between “the present” and “the absent” (like Schrödinger’s Cat). Because we are A/B, we must face ambiguities and decide if, in our minds, they are “lacks” or “holes”…

‘Language creates a worldview’ more than a worldview creates language. This isn’t to say worldviews don’t have any effect on language, but that language has an incredibly powerful impact on how we think about and see the world. As highlighted by Neil Postman in his book The End of Education, I. A. Richards would divide his class into three groups and ask each to write about language, but he would also provide each group with an opening sentence: either ‘language is like a tree,’ ‘language is like a river,’ or ‘language is like a building.’ ‘The paragraphs were strikingly different, with one group writing of roots and branches and organic growth; another of tributaries, streams, and even floods, another of foundations, rooms, and sturdy structures.’ As the exercise made clear, metaphor influences what we say, and to some extent, ‘what we say controls what we see.’

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Iowa. Broken Pencil. Allegory. Write Launch. Ponder. Pidgeonholes. W&M. Poydras. Toho. ellipsis. O:JA&L. West Trade. UNO. Pushcart Nominee. linktr.ee/ogros

Iowa. Broken Pencil. Allegory. Write Launch. Ponder. Pidgeonholes. W&M. Poydras. Toho. ellipsis. O:JA&L. West Trade. UNO. Pushcart Nominee. linktr.ee/ogros